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In the Gallery today...

Marsha Ogden  -- Botanical Art

Bird of Paradise by Marsha Ogden M Ogden Pink Anthurium

Birds of Paradise (Strelitzia reginae)

The Bird of Paradise captivates gardeners, flower aficionados, and artists alike. Originating in Africa, the Strelitzia first appeared in Europe at Kew Gardens, England. The plant is named for King George III’s House of Mecklenburg-Strelitz roots. Its bold colors, strong lines, and fantastical shape draw attention in the landscape, in arrangements, and on paper. It is a favorite painting subject of botanical artists. “Watch me soar” is its statement. Seeing these majestic plants in any setting is a treat: I love painting this tropical specimen that thrives in Hawaii, our beautiful island state that I visit every year.

For me, its psychedelic color combinations in the flower and the leaves drew me in and held me throughout the creation of this painting. I draw my subjects from real life outdoors. At the same time I prepare paint samples so as to capture the vibrant colors of leaves, flowers, vines and stems.  Including the finest details is emblematic of botanical art. Completing a painting can take 20 hours or more to render the finished piece as lifelike as humanly possible.

 This piece is a fine-art reproduction, using the highest quality archival inks and museum quality paper. It is one of a limited edition of 25. It carries my signature and number of the print in the run. You will enjoy this fine-art reproduction for years and years to come.

Pink Anthurium (Anthurium  andraeanum)

Anthuriums are also known as Flamingo Flowers. They are native to Colombia and Ecuador, but are found growing abundantly in shady areas in tropical climates. Their colors range from white to green, light yellow, pink, red, and variegated. The Anthurium’s waxy part is not actually the flower: it is the spathe. The flowers are tiny and grow on the finger-like spadix above the showy heart-shaped portion. Because of their sturdiness and long-lasting qualities, they make excellent cut flowers and make their way in tropical arrangements around the world.

This particular pink Anthurium is a cultivated indoor plant that graced my kitchen table for several weeks. I got to know it very well during that time: it was just the dash of color so needed in a record snowfall of a winter in Maryland. And, while I normally draw my subjects out of doors in their element, I found that the sun pouring in my sliding doors provided ample light to show off the fine details and color gradations on this gem. When I travel to Hawaii, each February, it stuns me anew that these beauties grow outside quite easily.

Including the finest details is emblematic of botanical art. Completing a painting can take 20 hours or more to render the finished piece as scientifically accurate and lifelike as humanly possible.

 This piece is a fine-art digital reproduction, using the highest quality archival inks and museum quality paper. It is one of a limited edition of 25. It carries my signature and number of the print in the run. You will enjoy this fine-art reproduction for years and years to come.

 Thank you for your interest in botanical art and my Pink Anthurium